Treatment of a patient with acromegaly and Traditional Chinese Medicine: case report (EN – ES)

Treatment of a patient with acromegaly and Traditional Chinese Medicine: case report (EN and ES)
Covarrubias E., Acupuncturista, Kinesiólogo at
Clinical Hospital Red Salud UC – Christus,
Integral health and medicine unit; Santiago, Chile.
Correspondence: emilio.covarrubias@gmail.com

Introduction
Acromegaly is a rare disease caused in most cases by a pituitary adenoma producing an excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH) and insulin growth factor (IFG-1) responsible for the physical and metabolic changes in the patient an estimated annual incidence of 3 to 4 cases per million inhabitants has been reported. However, the diagnosis is still complex and may imply greater morbidity for the potential patient when the disease is detected, so it’s better prognosis requires an early clinical suspicion in the detection and access to a specialized medical team that can confirm the illness.

The treatments that these patients require are long-term and with deleterious effects on their quality of life, in favor of suppressing the tumor. It has been reported that the damage to quality of life in these patients is similar to that of patients after receiving chemotherapy. In this group of patients, the physical, psychological and social aspects are affected, altering their quality of life. Some complications reported by patients are sleep disturbances, sexual dysfunctions, states of anxiety and depression, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, neuropathic pain, gastrointestinal discomfort, changes in body image, cognitive dysfunction, added to the chronic need for drugs of maintenance and possible requirement of radiotherapy, among other consequences, are configuring a multifactorial picture that in sum alters the quality of life of patients, and requires multidisciplinary management in their treatment.

The incorporation of quality of life measurement during the clinical follow-up of these patients has recently been recommended. Since it has been seen that the deterioration in the quality of life persists even when the disease has been resolved and the pharmacological treatment has been completed. From this global alteration of homeostasis in the patient, and deterioration of her quality of life, Traditional Chinese Medicine emerges as a complementary option in the management of signs and symptoms after treatment. Through the use of different therapeutic tools such as acupuncture, auriculotherapy, tuina massage, electroacupuncture, moxubustion, among others, the aim is for the person to improve their Qi (vital energy), and as the ultimate goal to restore internal “balance and harmony”. One of the key aspects in the contribution of Traditional Chinese Medicine for the benefit of these patients is the effect of the balance to the Hypothalamus – Pituitary – Adrenal axis, achieving an improvement in patients in multiple systems simultaneously. The following text describes the treatment with Traditional Chinese Medicine of a patient with a diagnosis of acromegaly treated with radiosurgery, facial paralysis in the right hemi face after viral infection, and the evolution during treatment and the results of level control examinations are described. of IGF-1.

Method
Patient with initials MA, male, age 40, consulted the comprehensive care unit of the Hospital Clínico de la red salud UC – Christus September 23, as a reason for initial consultation due to fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, gastrointestinal discomfort, insomnia, and facial pain in the right hemi face, sign of right dry eye. The initial evaluation is performed according to Chinese medicine and treatment sessions are planned. 16 sessions are held twice a week. Each session lasts 40 minutes, each session includes acupuncture, tuina massage, electroacupuncture and auriculotherapy. During the treatment, the patient is monitored in parallel with blood tests to evaluate his IGF-1 levels, and he maintains his pharmacological treatment and regular medical controls without variation. The most used acupuncture points are Du20, YinTang, St36, Sp9, Sp6, L3, Ren6, Ren4, St25, Sp4, added to local points on the face and tuina massage on the face and abdomen. Auriculotherapy points used are; shenmen, liver, spleen, kidney, subcortex and heart (Photo 1, 2).

 

 

 

Photo1: Patient during the Acupuncture and Electroacupuncture session.
Photo2: Patient with acupuncture needle at YinTang
point.

Results
The patient made a self-report of the acupuncture session and an account of the experience of it.Self-report of the TCM treatment experience:
At the beginning of the first session, with my own fears facing a different way to treat ailments at the end I felt an impressive relief of pain from the improvement of balance and ease in the face as well as mobility of the right eye. When I got home, I slept and I felt relief, rest, and a sense of well-being.”

In all sessions there was a progress of facial paralysis and dry eye. If the blinking worsened, there was no possibility of closing the eye, he had an indication for evaluation with oculoplastic to apply botox in the area. To date, I have a 90% facial recovery. At the dry eye level, 90% recovery is left with lubricating drops. Regarding pain, the sessions were very supportive, stopping taking medications such as ketorolac and paracetamol (Photo 3).

      

Photo 3: Evolution of facial paralysis in patient M.A. from 2019 to 2021.

At the level of symptoms typical of acromegaly during the sessions, note that at the end of the sessions, there was greater flexibility in the fingers of the hands and a deflation of them visually noticeable.

I should note that from the beginning of the sessions there is an improvement in the symptoms that an acromegalic has. I can sleep better, deflated hands, normal stress, considerable decrease in pain and muscle fatigue. Also note a considerable drop in IGF-1 349 throughout the disease process” (Photo 4).

Photo 4: Patient M.A., in a UC medical specialty center with an acupuncturist therapist.

Discussion
The main results after having treated the patient were his self-reported feeling of global well-being; improvement in fatigue levels, better sleep, less musculoskeletal pain and less feeling of anxiety, in addition, a decrease in IGF-1 levels could be recorded during acupuncture treatment. The great impact on the quality of life of this group of patients has been described that affect psychological, physical aspects and the medical treatment itself, and in this way constant evaluation and control of changes in quality of life during treatment has been recommended. as part of the follow-up of these patients.

On the other hand, treatment with Traditional Chinese Medicine is based on restoring internal balance and harmony in the person, achieving neuroendocrine homeostasis, and ultimately improving her quality of life. The comprehensive holistic approach, but at the same time based on a differential diagnosis according to the signs and symptoms of the patient, leads to a favorable result of improvement of their global and specific clinical picture. In TCM, the yin yang re-balance, the balance of the 5 elements and their corresponding organs and the proper movement of qi, blood and body fluids improve the health and well-being of the person, preventing future complications and avoiding the deterioration of the disease.

It has been studied that the homeostasis of the subject is related to an adequate interaction in the HPA axis. This has been seen in rats, due to the stimulation of some acupuncture points such as Es36 (Zusanli) or B6 (Sanyinjiao), which activate the HPA axis, managing to activate paraventricular nuclei in the hypothalamus, responsible for initiating the stress response producing CRH (corticotropin-releasing hormone). Where it has been seen that acupuncture and electroacupuncture would play an important role (but the mechanism is not yet completely clear) in the activation response of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and adrenal gland in modulating the response to stress and in turn Other studies report the modulation of the response to post-traumatic stress and sustained over time, associated with depression and anxiety, mediated by an increase in the synthesis of proteins required for neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus.

The neuroendocrine mechanisms by which acupuncture exerts a modulating effect on the subject are complex and are still under investigation, however, the results are promising allowing a better understanding of the therapeutic effect of TCM. Thus, further development is required in the evaluation and treatment of the quality of life of these patients, since it has been shown that this aspect turns out to be the trigger for multiple symptoms referred by the patient. Studies related to quality of life in patients with pituitary disease recommend the incorporation of quality of life measurement before, during and after treatment, since many of the symptom’s patients refer to persist even when medical treatment is completed. And it is from this need that acupuncture and TCM arises as a relevant contribution in the management of signs and symptoms for these patients, achieving a complement to improve their quality of life, functionality and helping to maintain a homeostasis in their body, opening thus a new door of therapeutic development and investigation and even more a treatment based on integrative medicine.

Conclusions
TCM has had a great impact throughout its history, in the management of the symptoms of different diseases, prevention, recovery and maintenance of good health. On the other hand, in recent years the knowledge and evidence of rare diseases has increased, even more so in the dimension of the deterioration of their quality of life and their multiple symptoms that are often beyond the reach of Western medicine. From this point of view, TCM is a great complementary contribution, in favoring the homeostasis of the neuroendocrine axis, regulation of the HPA axis, improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms, relief of musculoskeletal pain, better mood and better energy. In this way, a great challenge today is the development of a better research methodology to evaluate the neurophysiological effects of TCM in the patient, regulation of internal homeostasis related to IGF-1 levels, glycemia, musculoskeletal pain sensation, and above all its impact on the quality of life, achieving a better integrative understanding of the disease.

Bibliography

  1. ZhengLin Zhao, Effects of Acupuncture at Zu-Sasn-Li (ST36) on the Activity of the Hypothalamic – Pituitary – Adrenal Axis during ethanol withdrawal in rats. J Acupunct Meridian Stud (2014); 7 (5): 225-230.
  2. Fengxia Liang, Publisher: Acupuncture and Immunity. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015); 5: 1 – 2.
  3. Shao – Jun Wang, Acupuncture relieves the excessive excitation of hypothalamic – pituitary – adrenal cortex axis function and correlates with the regulatory mechanism of GR, CRH, and ACTHR. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2014); 1 – 9.
  4. Susan M Webb. Validity and clinical applicability of the acromegaly quality of life questionnaire, Acroqol: a 6-month prospective study. European Journal of Endocrinology (2006), 155; 269–277.
  5. Lia Silvia Kunzler. Cognitive-behavioral therapy improves the quality of life of patients with acromegaly. Pituitary (2018) 21: 323–333.
  6. Iris Crespo. Update on quality of life in patients with acromegaly. Pituitary (2017) 20: 185–188.
  7. Carrasco C., Therapeutic results in acromegalic patients: it is time to intervene. Rev Med Chile (2006).
  8. Xu Tao-Tao. Essence of “Shen (Kidney) controlling bones”: Conceptual analysis based on hypothalamic – pituitary – adrenal – osteo – related cell axis. Chin J Integr Med (2018). Nov; 24 (11): 806-808.
  9. Wang S., Acupoint specificity on acupuncture regulation of hypothalamic- pituitary- adrenal cortex axis function. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015) 15:87.
  10. Wang X., Life cultivation and rehabilitation of traditional Chinese medicine (2011). Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine Press.
  11. Guerín P., Energy diet therapy according to the five elements of Traditional Chinese Medicine (2015). Miraguano Editions.

 

Tratamiento de paciente con acromegalia y Medicina Tradicional China: reporte de caso

 Covarrubias E., Acupuncturista, Kinesiólogo; Clinical Hospital Red Salud UC – Christus;
Integral health and medicine unit; Santiago, Chile
Correspondencia: emilio.covarrubias@gmail.com

Introducción
La acromegalia es una enfermedad poco frecuente causada en la mayor parte de los casos por un adenoma hipofisiario produciendo una secreción excesiva de hormona de crecimiento (GH) y factor de crecimiento de insulina (IFG-1) responsable de los cambios físicos y metabólicos en el paciente Se ha reportado una incidencia anual estimada en 3 a 4 casos por millón de habitantes. Sin embargo, aún el diagnostico resulta complejo y puede implicar para el potencial paciente una mayor morbilidad al momento de la detección de la enfermedad por lo que su mejor pronóstico requiere una sospecha clínica precoz en la detección y acceso a un equipo médico especializado que logre confirmar la enfermedad.

Los tratamientos que requieren estos pacientes son a largo plazo y con efectos deletéreos en su calidad de vida, en favor de lograr suprimir el tumor. Se ha reportado que el daño en la calidad de vida en estos pacientes es similar a pacientes posterior a recibir quimioterapia. En este grupo de pacientes los aspectos físicos, psicológicos y sociales se ven afectados, alterando su calidad de vida. Algunas complicaciones que refieren los pacientes son, alteraciones del sueño, disfunciones sexuales, estados de ansiedad y depresión, fatiga, dolor músculo esquelético, dolor neuropatico, malestar gastrointestinal, cambios en la imagen corporal, disfunción cognitiva, sumado a la necesidad crónica de fármacos de mantención y posible requerimiento de radioterapia, entre otras consecuencias, van configurando un cuadro multifactorial que en suma altera la calidad de vida de los pacientes, y requiere un manejo multidisciplinario en su tratamiento.

Recientemente se recomienda la incorporación de la medición de la calidad de vida durante el seguimiento clínico de estos pacientes. Ya que se ha visto que el deterioro en la calidad de vida persiste aun cuando se haya resuelto la enfermedad y completado el tratamiento farmacológico. De esta alteración global de la homeostasis en el paciente, y deterioro de su calidad de vida, la Medicina Tradicional China surge como una opción complementaria en el manejo de los signos y síntomas posterior al tratamiento. A través del uso de distintas herramientas terapéuticas como acupuntura, auriculoterapia, masaje tuina, electroacupuntura, moxubustión, entre otros, se busca que la persona que mejore su Qi (energía vital), y como fin último lograr restablecer el “equilibrio y armonía” interno. Uno de los aspectos claves en el aporte de la Medicina Tradicional China para beneficio de esos pacientes es el efecto del balance al eje Hipotálamo – Hipofisis – Adrenal logrando una mejoría en los pacientes en multiples sistemas de forma simultánea. En el siguiente texto se describe el tratamiento con Medicina Tradicional China de un paciente con diagnóstico de acromegalia tratado con radiocirugía, parálisis facial en hemi cara derecha posterior a infección viral y se describe la evolución durante el tratamiento y los resultados de exámenes de control de niveles de IGF-1.

Método
Paciente de iniciales M.A., sexo masculino, edad 40 años, consulta a la unidad de atención integral del Hospital Clínico de la red salud UC – Christus 23 de septiembre, como motivo de consulta inicial por sensación de fatiga, dolor músculo esquelético, malestar gastrointestinal, insomnio, y dolor facial en hemi cara derecha, signo de ojo seco derecho. Se realiza la evaluación inicial según la medicina china y se planifican las sesiones de tratamiento. Se realizan 16 sesiones 2 veces por semana. Cada sesión tiene una duración de 40 minutos, cada sesión incluye acupuntura, masaje tuina, electroacupuntura y auriculoterapia. Durante el tratamiento el paciente se va controlando de forma paralela con exámenes de sangre para evaluar sus niveles de IGF-1, y mantiene su tratamiento farmacológico y controles médicos habituales sin variación. Los puntos de acupuntura más utilizados son Du20, YinTang, Es36, B9, B6, H3, Ren6, Ren4, Es25, B4, sumado a puntos locales en la cara y masaje tuina en cara y abdomen. Puntos de auriculoterapia utilizados son; shenmen, hígado, bazo, riñón, subcortex y corazón (Foto 1, 2).

Foto1: Paciente durante la sesión de Acupuntura y Electroacupuntura.
Foto2: Paciente con aguja de acupuntura en punto YinTang.

Resultados
El paciente realizo un autoreporte de autoreporte de la sesión de acupuntura y relato de su experiencia.
Autoreporte de la experiencia del tratamiento con MTC:

“Iniciada la primera sesión, con los temores propios frente a una forma diferente para tratar dolencias al finalizar sentí un alivio del dolor impresionante desde el mejoramiento del equilibrio y soltura en la cara como también movilidad del ojo derecho. Al llegar a mí casa, dormí y sentí un alivio, descanso y una sensación de bienestar.”

En todas las sesiones hubo un progreso de la parálisis facial y el ojo seco. Si el parpadeo empeoraba, no había posibilidad del cierre del ojo tenía indicación de evaluación con oculoplástico para aplicar bótox en la zona. A la fecha, tengo una recuperación a nivel facial de un 90 %. A nivel del ojo seco 90 % de recuperación quedando con gotas lubricantes. Respecto de los dolores las sesiones fueron de mucho apoyo, dejando de tomar medicamentos como Ketorolaco y paracetamol (Foto 3).

Foto 3: Evolución de parálisis facial de paciente M.A. desde 2019 a 2021.

A nivel de síntomas propios de la acromegalia durante las sesiones note que al finalizarlas presentaba mayor flexibilidad en los dedos de las manos y una deshinchazón de ellas notándose de forma visual.

Debo hacer notar que desde el inicio de las sesiones hay mejoramiento en los síntomas que un acromegálico tiene. Puedo dormir mejor, manos deshinchadas, estrés normal, considerable la disminución del dolor y fática muscular. También destacar una caída de la IGF-1 349 considerable durante todo el proceso de la enfermedad” (Foto 4).

Foto 4: Paciente M.A., en centro de especialidades médicas UC con terapeuta acupunturista.

Discusión
Los principales resultados luego de haber tratado al paciente fueron su sensación de bienestar global auto reportada; mejoría en niveles de fatiga, mejor dormir, menor dolor músculo esquelético y menor sensación de ansiedad, además se pudo registrar una disminución en los niveles de IGF-1 durante el tratamiento de acupuntura. Se ha descrito el gran impacto en la calidad de vida de este grupo de pacientes que inciden aspectos sicológicos, físicos y el tratamiento médico en sí y de esta forma se ha recomendado la evaluación y control constante de los cambios de calidad de vida durante el tratamiento como parte del seguimiento de estos pacientes.

Por otra parte, el tratamiento con Medicina Tradicional China se sustenta en restablecer el equilibrio y armonía interno en la persona, logrando una homeostasis neuroendocrina, y mejorando en último término su calidad de vida. El enfoque holístico integral, pero a la vez basado en un diagnóstico diferencial según los signos y síntomas del paciente, llevan a un resultado favorable de mejoría de su cuadro clínico global y específico. En MTC el re equilibrio yin yang, el balance de los 5 elementos y sus órganos correspondientes y el adecuado movimiento del qi, sangre y fluidos corporales mejoran la salud y bienestar de la persona, previniendo futuras complicaciones y evitando el deterioro de la enfermedad.

Se ha estudiado que la homeostasis del sujeto está relacionada con una adecuada interacción en el eje HPA. De esto se ha visto en ratas, por la estimulación de algunos puntos de acupuntura como Es36 (Zusanli) o B6 (Sanyinjiao), que activan el eje HPA, logrando activar núcleos paraventriculares en el hipotálamo, responsables de iniciar la respuesta del estrés produciendo CRH (hormona liberadora de corticotrofina). Donde se ha visto que la acupuntura, y electroacupuntura jugaría un importante rol (pero aún no está claro del todo el mecanismo) en la respuesta de activación del hipotálamo, hipófisis, y glándula adrenal en la modulación de la respuesta frente al estrés y a su vez otros estudios reportan la modulación de la respuesta frente al estrés post traumático y sostenido en el tiempo, asociado a cuadros de depresión y ansiedad, mediado por un aumento en la síntesis de proteínas requeridas para la plasticidad neuronal en el hipocampo.

Los mecanismos neuroendocrinos por los que ejerce un efecto modulador la acupuntura en el sujeto son complejos y aún están en vías de investigación, sin embargo, los resultados son prometedores permitiendo dar una comprensión mayor al efecto terapéutico de la MTC. Así también se requiere un mayor desarrollo en la evaluación y tratamiento de la calidad de vida de estos pacientes, ya que se ha demostrado que este aspecto resulta ser el gatillante de múltiples síntomas que refiera el paciente. Estudios relacionados con calidad de vida en pacientes con enfermedad pituitaria recomiendan la incorporación de la medición de calidad de vida antes, durante y después del tratamiento, ya que muchos de los síntomas refieren los pacientes persisten aun cuando se finaliza el tratamiento médico. Y es de esta necesidad que la acupuntura y MTC surge como un relevante aporte en el manejo de los signos y síntomas para estos pacientes, logrando se un complemento para mejorar su calidad de vida, funcionalidad y ayudando a mantener una homeostasis en su organismo, abriendo así una nueva puerta de desarrollo terapéutico e investigación y más aún un tratamiento basado en medicina integrativa.

Conclusiones
La MTC ha tenido un gran impacto a lo largo de su historia, en el manejo de la sintomatología de distintas enfermedades, prevención, recuperación y mantención de una buena salud. Por otra parte, en los últimos años los conocimientos y evidencia de enfermedades poco frecuentes ha aumentado, más aún en la dimensión del deterioro de su calidad de vida y sus múltiples síntomas que muchas veces escapan del alcance a la medicina occidental. Bajo esta mirada es que la MTC es un gran aporte complementario, en favorecer la homeostasis del eje neuroendocrino, regulación del eje HPA, mejoría en síntomas gastrointestinales, alivio del dolor músculo esquelético, mejor estado de ánimo y mejor energía. De esta forma un gran desafío actualmente es el el desarrollo de una mejor metodología de la investigación para evaluar los efectos neurofisiológicos de la MTC en el paciente, regulación de la homeostasis interna relacionada con los niveles de IGF-1, glicemia, sensación de dolor musculoesquelético, y sobretodo su impacto en la calidad de vida, logrando una mejor comprensión integrativa de la enfermedad.

Bibliografía

  1. ZhengLin Zhao, Effects of Acupuncture at Zu-Sasn-Li (ST36) on the Activity of the Hypothalamic – Pituitary – Adrenal Axis during ethanol withdrawal in rats. J Acupunct Meridian Stud (2014); 7(5): 225 – 230.
  2. Fengxia Liang, Editorial: Acupuncture and Inmunity. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015); 5: 1 – 2.
  3. Shao – Jun Wang, Acupuncture relieves the excessive excitation of hypothalamic – pituitary – adrenal cortex axis function and correlates with the regulatory mechanism of GR, CRH, and ACTHR. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2014); 1 – 9.
  4. Susan M Webb. Validity and clinical applicability of the acromegaly quality of life questionnaire, Acroqol: a 6-month prospective study. European Journal of Endocrinology (2006), 155; 269–277.
  5. Lia Silvia Kunzler. Cognitive-behavioral therapy improves the quality of life of patients with acromegaly. Pituitary (2018) 21:323–333.
  6. Iris Crespo. Update on quality of life in patients with acromegaly. Pituitary (2017) 20:185–188.
  7. Carrasco C., Resultados terapéuticos en pacientes acromegálicos: es tiempo de intervenir. Rev Med Chile (2006).
  8. Xu Tao-Tao. Essence of “Shen (Kidney) controlling bones”: Conceptual analysis based on hypothalamic – pituitary – adrenal – osteo – related cell axis. Chin J Integr Med (2018). Nov; 24(11): 806-808.
  9. Wang S., Acupoint specificity on acupuncture regulation of hypothalamic- pituitary- adrenal cortex axis function. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015) 15:87.
  10. Wang X., Life cultivation and rehabilitation of traditional chinese medicine (2011). Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine Press.
  11. Guerín P., Dietoterapia energética según los cinco elementos de la Medicina Tradicional China (2015). Miraguano Ediciones.
Leave a reply